#JJStyle: 200 Steps With Canali - Behind The Scenes

JJ Acuna interview for 200 Steps, Canali.com from Canali on Vimeo.

Before I procrastinate even further this month, since i’m (as of today) quite backlogged on so much work in general… I wanted to put everything on hold and take a moment to give a big warm THANK YOU and show my gratitude to the Italian suiting brand, Canali, for reaching out to us all the way here in Asia for a secret project that we’ve been working on together since March 2014 this year... a profile collaboration for their global web portal, Canali.com.

The project, part of Canali’s 200 Steps series of videos and interviews published on L’Edizione, the brand’s editorial platform, aims to interview “male professionals” like myself from all around the world in a monthly series of videos and oral interviews examining each gentleman’s processes and craft. Each of the talent interviewed is dressed by Canali in tailored wear for that season, and is focused less on the 80-year old brand and more on the interviewees, their work, and inspiration.

Each 200 Steps story is created within a day’s shooting, and culminates in a 2-3 minute interview film, a 30-second “Word Association” film, and a full Q+A article explaining the full context behind each gentleman’s work. I was told that brand director, and a third generation Canali, Ms. Elisabetta Canali, picks the interviewees herself for the global website. I, for one, was surprised to have met her myself at the interview shoot here in Hong Kong. She’s quite cool in person, and was very “hands-on”… really overseeing the whole entire process.

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For my story, Canali’s team wanted to focus on a designer-blogger’s thinking in relation to curation and the formulation of a story or perspective for the digital space. In order to express what I do and how this translates with tactility on film, their production team imagined a large square white canvas to hang centrally within the space… and throughout the two minute video, that canvas get’s filled with images i’ve taken over the years that have been placed on my various social media outlets thus far.

At first I was unsure, since i’ve only known my work to exist in a certain format online, and certainly not on a “white canvas”, however once i’ve spoken with their London team on the phone, and after they themselves have sent me mood board pegs of example “treatments”, portrait shots, and other reference concepts, I quickly got around to enjoying playing around with how they wanted to frame this whole thing to fit both me, my story, and their format.

Anyway, the rest is history as they say!

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Some Behind-The-Scenes Photographs from our shoot….

The “White Canvas” at the start of the evening….

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Gradually filling up slowly…

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The canvas wasn’t allowed to sway back and forth, so the crew really took great pains to secure it on the set.

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Each time a photograph was placed on the canvas, it was captured on film… sometimes two or three times.

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The Director, Jon Clements, was really detail oriented as to the composition of the photographs on the canvas…

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The production team at London’s Spring Creative, plus the brand team at Canali, picked out the all the photographs from all my social media accounts to be placed on this White Canvas. To be honest, when I started the website and the whole “Wanderlister” thing a few years ago… placing all these images online, there was no way I would have anticipated any of this to come to fruition from the content, that up to this point… i’ve only kept on the Digital Space.

Their team picked out the photographs to cover the five topics on my website; Architecture, Art, Design, Food, and Life/Style.

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Taking a step back, seeing it all up there (I put up each of the photographs myself)… it was really something to see. 

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To step back and have all these things jump out from the computer, and be composed in the physical space like this was really cool, weird, strange, and in a way… a general cosmic affirmation of the whole thing that I do. Very interesting how it takes a collaboration with a big global brand, to really force one to assess and define their work. I definitely did some soul searching by doing this interview with Canali. Most of what I said was off-the-cuff, which surprised even myself. It’s like “A-ha”, so that’s what being an Architect by day, and a blogger by night in Asia is all about. It’s even news to me.

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So for that, I thank Elisabetta Canali, the whole Canali House in Milan, and the guys Spring Creative in London for such a great opportunity. I really learned about myself though all of this as well.

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Other 200 Steps profiles include the brand’s new Creative Consultant, fashion designer, Andrea Pompilo

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Design duo, Barber and Osgerby

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Stage actor, Tony Stephens

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And Typographical artist, Job Wouters.

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Check out our FULL INTERVIEW with Canali via 200 Steps plus our “Words Association” Video.

WEAR Canali . Wheelock House, Shop C, Ground Floor, 20 Pedder Street, Central, Hong Kong . T: +852 2918 1745

JJ.

#theWanderlist: F11 Photographic Museum Opens in Happy Valley, Housed in Restored Art Deco Structure

Here’s something new in the neighborhood, the F11 Photographic Museum located in Happy Valley Hong Kong will mark its official opening with a Best in Show exhibition by legendary American photographer, Elliott Erwitt, who will himself attend the museum’s launch on September 18th. Erwitt is expected to sign copies of his latest book, Regarding Women that same week.

Best in Show is curated by the museum’s owner, Douglas So who is a former corporate lawyer and philanthropist, and photography expert, India Dhargalkar, and will feature over 50 original photographs from Erwitt’s collection.

“Our vision for F11 Photographic Museum is to generate interest in photography and an appreciation for the art form,” explains So. “We do this through our curated collection of rare cameras, books and prints. In choosing to house the museum in a Grade III historic building, we also hope to encourage more private conservation and revitalisation of Hong Kong’s heritage properties.”

The new museum occupies a three-storey Art Deco ex-residential building, newly restored in the neighborhood’s Yuk Sau Street. The ground and first floors are expected to house exhibitions, while the second floor will be a private museum to showcase… a VAST DISPLAY OF LEICA CAMERAS, including a Model A Anastigmat from 1925… which was the first year Leitz sold cameras to the public. The upper level of the museum will be home to over 1000 titles from the Magnum Book collection, including many rare and first signed editions and maquettes… available to the public for research purposes.

VISIT Elliott Erwitt’s ‘Best In Show’ Exhibition at the  F11 Photographic Museum 18 September to 30 November . 11 Yuk Sau Street, Happy Valley, Hong Kong . T: +852-65161122 

JJ.

#theWanderlist: A Style Revival at Bangkok’s Hotel Muse

Thanks to The Luxe Nomad, me and two friends were able to take a summer pause in order to refresh and revive with a quick three-day escape from one urban jungle… into another at Bangkok’s quirky Hotel Muse, part of the “M Gallery” brands of hotels under Accor group. Hotel Muse has actually been in operation for about 4-5 years, and is situated right in the centre of it all, but a little ways away from the actual hustle of Bangkok’s central shopping district, Siam Square, only some stops away on the elevated train. 

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Speaking of elevated train, Hotel Muse is less than a block away from the Phloen Chit stop, which is connected to both, Central Chidlom and the brand new silvery and shiny, Central Embassy Mall. (I was too busy relaxing, so I didn’t even get to go.) That said, who cares about malls, my friends just wanted to get rest, eat, spa, and go to JJ-Market. Thats it. And who can blame them… Hong Kong is already full of malls!

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Hotel Muse, part romantic getaway-part business hotel, is all about “dark sophistication” which is due to its Rama-V era concept, and houses 174 rooms, 11 suites, a sitting library, a full gym (with two bored trainers), a sitting pool (swimming is difficult in there), and a few destination restaurants. People come to Hotel Muse’s Medici restaurant for the best in modern-rustic Italian fare that apparently makes some really great steaks and wine pairings. The Speakeasy is the Muse’s answer to an old-style mixology bar, but with a rooftop view of the city. Su Tha Ros, hosts the hotel’s morning breakfast (which is so-so), but transforms into a wonderful Thai restaurant in the evening that a bunch of my local high-society friends who live there go because it offers a private and more intimate dining experience with authentic Thai fare.

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Generally everyone was happy with their stay. What really made it was that everyone slept so well in Hotel Muse’s beds… ie. could be the best part of the hotel. Everyone, including I, has been so stressed out within the last few weeks that we all agreed, a separation from Hong Kong in general, is a plus… tack on a nice quality bed and you’ve got a winning trip.

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The owner of the Hotel is really into historical nostalgia ie. he has a few personal antique pieces throughout the property. Additionally he loves the word “muse”, because it reminds him of these other words… “music”, “Museum”, “musing”, “amusement park”, etc. which harks back to the concept of creation and exhibition, which to me pretty much describes the hotel’s quirky and showy Asia-Euro-inspired decor. The letter “M” is also everywhere in the hotel, which is tied to this branding with the word “muse” and the “M” Gallery group.

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Whether the style of Interiors is for you or not is dependant on your taste, but the design direction is whimsical where it’s necessary (in the public areas and restaurants) and restrained when needed (in your bedroom.)

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All I know is, anywhere with a DIY Bloody Mary station for breakfast is fine by me.

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When in Bangkok, make sure to make a stop at JJ Market ie. Chatuchak / Jatujak, which I absolutely love. I go there all the time, and I post about it on this blog each time I go because you know what… there’s always something new to see, something new on offer, and the Thais really have style and trends for next year already figured out NOW and have it on offer at Chatuchak. My friends who live there think i’m so silly because they fly to Hong Kong and Japan to shop. That said it’s a different kind of shopping, and it’s not only Thailand… every country I go to, I don’t buy souvenirs… I buy local designer pieces. You know, I’m all about supporting local style ecosystems! If its something you can keep for more than two years (wherever it’s from), then it’s worth it.

Some of the new shops/concepts at Jatujak (Chatuchak) I discovered on this trip include, A Laboratory, a casual his/hers boutique with a bar/cafe adjacent.

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This casual shirts shop called, Kook, with really nice prints.

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This place made great shirts and accessories for men. It’s called, does mondays have an apostrophe before the s?. I kid you not.

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My friend bought two pieces here at Tar Mafia. Who knew?

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I love the ceramic and brass jewellery on offer at Mary Lou.

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I bought quite a few shirts here at SM Object.

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They also had simple accessories on offer.

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This one was my friend’s take home from JJ Market. Insanity.

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We again thank The Luxe Nomad booking website AND Hotel Muse for our wonderful two-night stay in their property. Hotel Muse plus other properties are available at cut rate costs at on that amazing website which specializes in relaxing and tasteful getaways in the region.

Where to next?

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BOOK The Luxe Nomad / STAY Hotel Muse Bangkok . 55/555 Langsuan Road, Ploenchit Road, Lumpini, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand / DRINK The Speakeasy Rooftop Bar / EAT Medici Kitchen & Bar / WEAR A Laboratory . Jatujak Weekend Market, Section 4, Soi 49.2 / WEAR Mary Lou . Jatujak Weekend Market, Section 4 Soi 2, Shop Number 083 

JJ.

SG_WOMEN_615x100 New Season

DESIGN NOTES: A Panoply of Dreams, Omar Khan Home Collection Debuts

My pal whom I first met in Hong Kong, Parsons graduate and amazing designer, Omar Khan, made a name for himself doing great visual merchandising work for On Pedder and then Joyce before going solo doing freelance work for events, and as a spatial designer under his new company, The Omar Khan Collective. Omar then moved from Hong Kong to Malaysia a few years ago, to continue his work for clients and friends in the broader region, which, through his various projects, he was able to slowly accumulate a whole archive of artisan-crafted handmade featured carpets he has created through his journey which can now be sold under a sub-moniker, Omar Khan Home

Omar Khan Home, has since debuted this past year at the first Maison et Objet Asia Singapore in March 2014, and has already been exhibited at Lane Crawford’s Chengdu Flagship… with word on the street that it may also be on offer here at Lane Crawford in Hong Kong as well. (Will keep you updated on this.)  

Omar Khan, a Singaporean with Dutch, Chinese, Egyptian, Pakistani, and German roots, was educated in the states since High School to college, uses his amalgamated past experiences to create designs which re-orient the “orient”, but in a graphic format that is contemporary and romantic… ie. “a panoply of objects, textures, and sensations”, according to him. The line as of now consists of 15 designs, with each comprising of about 3 different variations and made of wool, viscose, and silk… all hand tufted in Malaysia with Omar’s personal guidance on each piece that goes from factory to client. His signature rugs are quintessentially memorable and are each defined by “strong graphic motifs and fantastical elements” which Omar says are derived from his “dreams”. We have a quick chat with Omar about the new Omar Khan Home line and his amazing 2014 debut so far.

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theWanderlister+: Congratulations Omar on the launch of the the Omar Khan Home, tell me about the new line and how it fits conceptually with your design company, The Omar Khan Collective?

Omar Khan: The Omar Khan Collective and the home brand, Omar Khan Home, is really a company and product that wants to tell your story, be it thru lifestyle, retail, residential or commercial projects. We shy away from trends and we believe a personal investment into your life means more. I suppose thats why I decided to launch with a collection of statement rugs.

From an interior perspective, I always felt that having a rug in your space is an anchoring element. From a wellness perspective, we see the rug as more than just a rug, it’s a statement. You chose that piece because on some level it resonated with you. 

theW+: The last time you were on Wanderlister.com, we discussed your VM work for Papillon, a lifestyle boutique destination in Kuala Lumpur. That was about 4 years ago. Do you still do similar kinds of work today? And how does your work for The Omar Khan Collective feed into your home styling brand and vice versa?

OK: We are first and foremost an interior focused company. We have a consulting arm that deals with issues outside the realm of interiors but still very much intrinsic to the end presentation, We have done big atrium installations for two malls in Kuala Lumpur and some VM and  branding consultation around the region.

Within the consultancy we have what we call “Crafted and Curated” and this is an initiative specific to hotels who want to up the ante with their gift stores. Omar Khan Home will be expanding into scented candles and luxury towels which we will use to anchor the merchandise selection and then add on with a special curation from local artisans. Selfishly i miss a really good hotel gift store so to be able to bring that back is very interesting to me.

theW+: The feedback of your work has been quite positive. Some of your rugs have been showcased throughout China via Lane Crawford and other parts of Asia as well. Why do you think that the response has been so great? Did you expect it all?

OK: For me the rugs are a labor of love, which comes from a pure creative side that I feel resonates with people. I am planning a series of trunk shows throughout the region and it will be interesting to see the perspective on the collection from country to country. I always believe in the transformative effects a rug can have on a person and in their home, so for me that positive response specific to wellness is quite rewarding.

theW+: Who do you look to as your design heroes?

OK: I suppose they come from all different design fields. Hayze Menon, the man behind the music from my video, Brian Christie, who concepted and directed it, Meredith McLean, a creative powerhouse whose ability to take your vision and go the extra mile to turn it into reality. I’ve been privileged  enough to work with them and continue working with them on collaborative projects moving forward. 

Statement Rugs by Omar Khan Home from Omar Khan on Vimeo.

In regards to the usual suspects, I’ve always had Ray and Charles Eames, up there on the same pedestal as well as Erwin Olaff, Tim Walker & Dries van Noten.

theW+: What else will we see from Omar Khan Home, I know you will be collaborating with Lane Crawford in Hong Kong, among other projects…

OK: Moving forward, as a company our biggest ethos is that everything presented by The Omar Khan Collective should resonate with you. I hope to expand into Bed & Bath products with a range of oversized luxury towels, chinaware, fabric, and wallpaper collaborations. Such is the case for our brand new and very limited range of scented candles from France. There are 4 notes - our hero scent “Fleure Blanche”, “Palace”, “Lounge”, and my personal favourite “Bad Boy”. I have such great dreams for them in my head : )

DESIGN Omar Khan Collective and Omar Khan Home

JJ.

DESIGN NOTES: Designer Stefano Tordiglione Breathes New Life in Brooks Brothers Hong Kong Flagship

The Menswear market is huge in Asia, and especially in Hong Kong, so no wonder there’s been a great selection of casual, business, and luxury bespoke tailoring labels that have entered the city within the last few years. The newest player in town is a beautiful new flagship for American tailoring company, Brooks Brothers, in the IFC. This project, by HK-based studio, Stefano Tordiglione Design, seeks inspiration from the house’s original flagship in New York City on Madison Avenue as the creative basis of its conceptual direction.

Items reminiscent of the original Manhattan architecture include the shop’s exterior stucco plasters which surround columns, the interior ceiling, and the window details. A cash-wrap island in the middle of the shop, greets customers at entry, reminiscent of classic destination Department Stores in history. Antique pieces are also used for the shop’s various fixtures and visual merchandising islands, plus all furnishings are crafted in Chicago Heritage and American Walnut to reflect the brand’s American heritage. New designs incorporated by Stefano Tordiglione include a fresh take on the industrial-style chandelier, and fitting rooms which reflect old style Chicago lofts. Also on display in the shop are large-scale photographs of Brooks Brothers heritage shirts over time from its first ready-to-wear collection, button downs, and non-iron shirts.

Other design innovations include a whimsical direction for the shop’s mosaic floor, handmade in Italy and redesigned to resemble a classic New York pavement, the pale green striped walls based on a Park Avenue flat, and on the timber façade… a bronze geometric pattern based on a classic window pane from a 20th Century Long Island mansion. The message is clear, classic heritage is modern again.

Brooks Brothers will soon be celebrating its 200-year anniversary, and Stefano Tordiglione Design makes sure that the Hong Kong IFC flagship will be ready to give new life as it stands on a strong brand’s DNA. 

SHOP Brooks Brothers IFC . Shop 1096, 8 Finance Street, Central, HK, 3196 8228 HK . T: +852 2234 7088 / DESIGN Stefano Tordiglione Design LTD

JJ.

#JJStyle: Blast Off Cosmonaut, Jonathan Liang’s AW14 Collection

One of Asia’s hottest designers, Jonathan Liang, is busy at work in his Paris studio making the most out of the best opportunities, not only as a young 26 year old making global waves in fashion via his own namesake line, but also as the new Creative Director of Malaysia’s “IT” label, Dude & the Dutchess.

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On offer in stores now is Jonathan Liang’s Fall-Winter 2014 collection inspired by the Cosmonaut. Before fashion, Liang was an illustrator. The narrative as concept is obviously on full display here stating that the collection is “an adventure starting from the Big Bang through the cosmos - a life of space suits worthy of Jane Fonda’s Barbarella.” Signature Liang is at play with each item’s form dependent on function and utility, yet defined by refined feminine silhouettes and innovative use of various fabrics and textures. 

This collection is complimented by a collection of exclusive footwear designed in collaboration with Nelissa Hilman.

WEAR Jonathan Liang

JJ.

 

#JJStyle: Lane Crawford A/W 14, A Focus On ‘Modern Living’

For the latter half of 2014, Lane Crawford based in Hong Kong, renews its focus on the elements which enrich and inspire our daily lives. The latest visual campaign by the prolific Laurent Segretier with Hair & Makeup by Katsuya Kamo, expresses the season’s must-have looks and edits, frames fashion and accessories amidst a backdrop of set pieces, animations, and installations by six of China’s newest generation of smart style thinkers; namely Gautier Chen, Cui Dan, Leaf Greener, Lucia Liu, Naihan Li, and Zhoujie Zhang.

Zhoujie Zhang brings a world of digital objects to Lane Crawford, using a special technique to create 25 women’s bust forms made of hexagonal steel formations. Furniture maker and architect, Naihan Li, will present four crates reflecting the modern gentleman’s apartment living. Street style star and ELLE China Senior fashion editor, Leaf Greener and stylist Lucia Liu, will each formulate an exclusive fashion collaboration with Lane Crawford. Esquire China’s fashion director, Gautier Chen, and GQ China’s fashion director, Dan Cui, will each formulate an exclusive collaboration as well that will focus on Menswear.

For the coming season, expect shearlings, tailored classic winter coats, thick cozy knits, and fringes contrasting with soft fluid skirts for women. For men, Sartorialist looks are still quite strong, with a touch of rock and roll look in dark tones and sporty fabrics. Also for men, more custom costume jewellery will be on offer.

SHOP Lane Crawford

JJ.

#theWanderlist: BEP Vietnamese Kitchen Stands Out By Fusing Street Style Viet Meals With Low-Key “Normcore” Branded Design, And It Works

For some new dining destinations in Hong Kong, maybe the best way to stand out is to keep things minimalist, easy, and not look like theres so much effort in trying to stand out. I mean new “must-go” restaurants in this city open almost every week, and this current normcore attitude, you know the “desire to NOT stand out” and the “opposite of hardcore”… is maybe what works if one really needs to make a mark these days amongst the glut of dining choices on offer.

That said, being normcore, is not as easy at it looks. One has to be methodical about materiality, textures, lighting, form, layout, and overall aesthetic planning. There’s a difference between a space or restaurant that’s minimally Designed vs. one that is just… well… empty.

BEP Vietnamese Kitchen opened just recently, and the group who runs it knows exactly what they’re doing since they’ve spent all these years perfecting the casual Vietnamese offer through their other brand, Nha Trang. BEP is located in a little alleyway just behind PURE Gym Soho off Staunton Street with a panoramic glazed window framed in a seemingly untreated silver aluminum cladding. The feeling is that of a diner you’ve seen before, and the immediate familiarity and openness in the facade design (also a row of tall chairs for outdoor seating), makes anyone feel welcome in this joint.

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The interior and exterior work is designed by Candace Campos of ID, originally from Los Angeles, now based in Hong Kong. And Before BEP, Campos has worked on other F&B projects in the city such as Mana, Tate Dining Room, and Heirloom and a few other residential projects under her belt. Campos kept things minimal at BEP with light timber tables, and sexy chairs that look like folded cardboard. Columns are clad in square stark white ceramic tiles with a dark grouting which creates a “subway” style grid, underpinning all the light timber and raw concrete finishes. It feels like a cool easy anteen in Brooklyn or Los Angeles. 

Together with Campos, the branding work for BEP was executed by Danielle Huthart through her firm, Whitespace, with denim uniforms designed by Paola Sinisterra of Tangram (apparently). This is a style trio that’s hard to beat.

Oh and the food… so my friend, Louise, took me here one Saturday, and everything they’ve got are easy to eat shareable snacky dishes like Squid Cakes, Pomelo Salad, Stir Fried Clams, Beef Salad, Sesame Rice Crackers, Garlic Fried Chicken Wings, various options of Bun Chay (dry noodle with fried goods on top), and you know the basic Pho offerings. For those who are into that stuff… there’s plenty of Sriracha for you to plop into your meals. Price wise its a great deal with meals coming out to about 100hkd a person (and it’s Central…AND it’s a place you actually WANT to be seen in!) It could be my new local.

My favorite dish? The Banh Xeo, a thin flour crepe stuffed with shrimps, pork, lettuce, and herbs. I loved it with fish sauce. So delicious. Give it a go. It’s very economical, nothing to lose, lots to gain.

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Some Photos via BEP Facebook. Some Photos by Me.

EAT BEP Vietnamese Kitchen . Lower Ground Floor, 9-11 Staunton Street, SOHO, Central, Hong Kong . T: +852 25227533 / DESIGN Candace Campos of ID / BRANDING Whitespace Hong Kong 

JJ.

 

DESIGN NOTES: Facebook Hong Kong’s Headquarters Localizes With Wall Graphics Similar To Works of Local Artist

Making the rounds on the interwebs is Facebook’s new Hong Kong show headquarters on the 60th floor of One Island East. At 11,000 sq.ft, Facebook in Hong Kong  is all typically very “Facebook” in terms of office programming and interior design. The Coconuts Hong Kong blog calls it “super hip” and “luxurious”. Although the office is primarily a marketing showroom (since most of the coding works are done at Facebook’s headquarters in California), its cool to see that there is a need to have such a “visible” office in Hong Kong to represent the Asian Market… ie. Hong Kong earns Facebook a lot of $$$$.

That said, it’s weird then that the “Cool graffiti with a Hong Kong flair” that Coconuts Hong Kong writes about that adorns Facebook Hong Kong’s new space closely mirrors the work of one of Hong Kong’s art darlings, Peter Yuill, whom I interviewed and featured on this blog several times before. As far as I know, Yuill didn’t execute the works in the Facebook headquarters, but he wouldn’t tell me more than that. That said, hopefully since Hong Kong makes Facebook a lot of money, it would be nice to see Facebook giving back to the local context and creative culture instead of setting foot in the city, and simply doing a god-forbid, “China Copy” of local Hong Kong artist’s works… which I hope is not the case in this situation. It’s okay to import a brand in the city, especially if it makes a brand money, but to do a surface and merely visual representation of local Hong Kong art and artist’s work, instead of outright cooperative engagement with the artist, is more harm to the brand, and will most likely make that brand lose street cred amongst  a percentage of its core constituents.

Will report if I hear anything more about this. I think Peter’s work is excellent, and i’ve seen his work in different commercial and F&B environments before. It’s really weird to see a Peter Yuill-type work in someone’s office that isn’t done by Peter himself… and it’s quite a wonky version of his style as well.

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UPDATE 14.07.28 5:30PM: Quite a discussion is happening on the comments area over on our Facebook Page, where some of our readers have remarked on the close similarity between works by artist, Tsang Tsou Choi and Peter Ross Art. Tsang Tsou Choi aka. “King of Kowloon” is deceased, but Peter Ross still makes art in Hong Kong to this day. Most recently Peter Ross’ work was featured in Hong Kong Magazine.

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PHOTO CREDITS: All Images of Facebook Hong Kong’s Interiors above via MARKETING INTERACTIVE / Coconuts Hong Kong. Last three images copyright Peter Yuill from his social media accounts and website.

DESIGN Peter Yuill

JJ.

#theWanderlist: Fashionistos, Design Junkies, and Carnivores at ED1TUS

Wong Chuk Hang, Hong Kong’s rough industrial district on the West Side of town may at first seem like a collection of junky old factory buildings right now, but in a couple of years time, one may just have to say that this area could be the city’s closest contender to a “true” design centre. And by Design Centre, i’m not talking about consumer focused centres like PMQ, i’m talking about the area in town where design, fashion, food, and art can converge organically due to a healthy and well supported creative business eco-system. Mix that in with the need for REALLY sizeable and open loft-like spaces that creatives generally yearn for… then you’ve got an organic business enclave.

The Lane Crawford headquarters are located here and so is the SPRING Workshop, and a handful of designer’s showrooms in The Factory…  all beautiful, contemporary, and very in the moment. This week, I wanted to highlight a new addition to the neighborhood… a menswear-focused showroom for distributors dubbed, ED1TUS, located a few doors down from Lane Crawford.

David Wakely, the company’s co-founder and head curator, toured me and my friends around one Saturday and we basically stayed for a couple of hours checking out everything since sample sales were on live.

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ED1TUS responds to Hong Kong’s evidently strong Menswear market in relation to all of Asia, which is apparently twice the size of the Asian womenswear market. FYI, Menswear sales in the region including China also account for 20% of the global luxury market.

Here’s the thing, until the last few years,  just when the “Sartorial Dandy” became a thing for all guys, “Menswear” as a sector used to be safe, boring, utilitarian, and formal. Now guys feel that it is okay to dress more fashionable, and men are being educated by bespoke suiting shops like The Armoury and Moustache. David, a seasoned ex-menswear buyer for Lane Crawford, saw the opportunity for more brand awareness, diversity, and further education for the region, catering to an ever growing “Middle Luxury Market” composed of young men always in search of the new, the cool, the interesting, and the different… ie. labels not yet readily available in high end department stores, but with a style clout and price range above the likes of Zara and the Gap.

The ED1TUS showroom is roomy and spacious, with nothing for sale but a few menswear accessories, knick knacks, and magazines. The showroom is not closed and is open to the public as evidence of its shared space collaboration with modern furniture destination Casa Capriz (who picked up from Chai Wan and moved front end operations here in this showroom), and the inclusion of a deli dubbed, The Butchers Club, a restaurant open to the public for lunch and dinner, and has become a destination in Hong Kong for many looking for great deli sandwiches and amazing steak dinners.

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Brands on offer include a casual Italian contemporary brand, Mauro Grifoni, cashmere styles by Drumohr, olive oil finished leathers by Stewart, and handmade footwear by CM Made In Italy. Some items from ED1TUS I also love include men’s bags by Meilleur Ami, fragrances by Mirko Buffini, bath and body products by Australia’s Gentleman’s Brand Co.

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For those gents looking for items for the home, the Casa Capriz showroom offers masculine unique and vintage items for the home with emphasis on the 1950’s to 1970’s modern era, and amazing lamps designed by Lumio. 

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Check out the showroom, because one of the three founders are always there. If not David, then his partners Jino Khidir (ex-Tom Ford) and Jules Shah (ex-Monocle and Konzepp) will be there on hand to assist. For Casa Capriz, founder, Irene Capriz, will always be there.

Speaking of Irene Capriz… I’m really loving these table selections from her curated furniture shop… if Only Hong Kong had larger living rooms in general!

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I’m a big fan of this sweat style from Mauro Grifoni.

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I also would like to thank my dear friend and art advisor, Zoe Pena (right) for the amazing lunch she hosted at her gallery, LIGHTBOMBS Contemporary, located a few doors down from Lane Crawford and ED1TUS. Through the lunch, I met the really cool editor and home stylist, Kissa Castaneda, who is the sole reason why I subscribed to all issues of ELLE Decor Philippines (obviously I’m a fan), and is now bringing a bit of the magic she brought at ELLE Decor for us here in Hong Kong via her new gig at Home Journal.

Welcome to Hong Kong, Kissa!

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All of us ended up rummaging through ED1TUS and Casa Capriz for a couple of hours to burn off that lunch. It was good times. 

Nice to see the Wong Chuk Hang hood buzzing and doing so well!

VISIT ED1TUS (with Casa Capriz + The Butchers Club Deli) . Shui Ki Industrial Building, 16th FL No.18, Wong Chuk Hang Road, Aberdeen, Hong Kong . T: +852 9760 0437 (ED1TUS) . T: +852-2884 0768 (The Butchers Cub Deli) . T: +852 9318 1730 (Casa Capriz)

JJ.