The Vertical City, Renderings of Hong Kong’s Iconic Facades by Architect, Daphne Mandel

Architect, turned artist, Daphne Mandel, moved to Hong Kong six years ago in 2008. Having worked in landscape and architecture in Paris, and even co-founding a studio, Daphne’s life has led her to this side of the globe where she began to pursue a new path in Art. The tight and compact scale of Hong Kong in relation to a more open and spread out Paris made it a bit difficult for her to easily transition to her work in landscape and urban planning to fit within this seemingly chaotic and piecemeal planning scale of the Asian City. However, it’s exactly in the compact vertical nature of the city, and the unique texture of Hong Kong’s concrete jungle, that Mandel has extracted a new inspiration. Her work, a series of renderings of the city’s facades, is a way for her to process the new find, and re-compose this information into a strikingly visual composition. The exhibition, which launched last week at the new Man Mo Café located within Hong Kong’s tight antique alleyways, is a perfect fit to present a series of works, inserting back within the context, paintings which are in direct reference of it.

We speak briefly with Daphne in relation to exciting her “Hong Kong Facades” series.

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theW+: Tell me about your latest works exhibiting at Man Mo Cafe?

Daphne Mandel: The ‘Hong Kong Facades’ series is inspired by the city’s wild and restless urbanisation.  Hong Kong’s brutal urbanscape is for me a constant source of inspiration.  The density, the giant facades and the accumulation of elements on different scales, levels and layers create a fascinating visual and graphic scene.  I like to explore the rough beauty of these urban contrasts while introducing a good dose of poetry, absurdity, and humour.  The use of different media permits me to transpose a sense of realism and combine it with unexpected or surreal elements.  While the result is never meant to be serious or controversial,  it is about revisiting these compact and opaque urbanscapes by telling new stories. It’s the fruit of pure imagination.

Man Mo Café is symbolically and largely by coincidence the perfect location for this show.  It is anchored in the middle of Cat Street Antique market (Upper Lascar Row), in the heart of Sheung Wan.  A congregation of antique dealers, oversize ceramics shop, curio merchants and metal workers coexist with the nearby upscale art galleries of Hollywood Road.  These juxtapositions and contrasts are among the essences of my inspiration.

theW+: When did you start rendering Hong Kong’s facades and why is rendering these facades important to you?

DM: As an architect, the phase I am always more excited about in the whole project proposal process is the rendering. Once one has resolved all the constraints regarding the program, the function, the technical and financial, there comes the challenge of how to express the product for the sell, and how to tell a story about ambiance, space, material, textures through the power of images.

My ‘Hong Kong Façades’ series is free of any project reality and constraints. It is only the expression of a fantasy world illustrated inside or outside the city facades.  You will rarely find representation of human beings in my art works.  It’s a way to disconnect my works from any sense of reality.

theW+: Tell us about your background, where you are from, and why you live in Hong Kong.

DM: I was born in Lausanne, Switzerland to a French father and a Dutch mother and grew up in Paris.  I studied architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning in Versailles and graduated in 2000.  I co-founded the Paris based landscape architecture and urban planning firm, Gilot&Mandel Paysage.  We were named the “Best Young Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture Professionals” in France (2006) for our work.  Our firm designed landscape urban projects of various scales, including public parks, city centres, cultural sites, and sports venues in France and abroad. 

The reason of my move to Hong Kong (2008) is unrelated to my career but turned out to be an incredible source of inspiration to explore other means of creative and artistic expression.

theW+: Besides Hong Kong’s facades, what other things do you like to paint?

DM: So far, Hong Kong has been my main subject and I feel that I could continue to explore it for much longer under many angles. All of my art works are conceived in the same way I render images for an architectural or urban planning project… using mixed media such as painting, collage and digital printing.  

My first work experience in an architectural studio was at Edouard François Studio (Paris).  There, I was taught to try to maintain the conceptual dimension of the project all the way through its final representation as opposed to try to reach ultra realism.  That way, the poetry and the magic of the concept was more likely to survive through the realization of the project.

theW+: Have you completely given up your previous career as a designer? If so where will go from here (career wise)? If not how do you think each of your work lives will help each other out inspirationally?

DM: I remain active as an architect and I have recently been involved in a large landscape design project in Korea for the training center of an insurance company.  There are potentially more design projects for me in the near future in Seoul.  Being an artist is a fairly new experience. I was so pleased to encounter a very positive and enthusiastic response, which encouraged me to pursue that route.

These two routes are totally interconnected and I could have never produced these artworks without having worked as an architect before. These two activities are definitely feeding the other, in terms of representational technique and inspirational themes.

VISIT Hong Kong Facades by Daphne Mandel . Exhibit Ends 2014 MAY 20 . Man Mo Café, 40 Upper Lascar Row (Cat Street/Off Hollywood road), Sheung Wan, Hong Kong . T:+852 2644 5644 . Tue to Sun, 12 - 3pm and 6pm - midnight

JJ.

Zaha Zings! New Tower For PolyU Design (PHOTOS)

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Okay. Let me just put it out there and get the obvious criticisms i’ve been hearing on and on about about Zaha Hadid’s design for the new new PolyU Design Jockey Club Innovation Tower out the way. Ready? Here goes:

CRITIC: The Tower is out of context with the rest of the Hong Kong PolyU Campus in Hung Hom.

ME: This is a criticism that most new “avant-garde” iconic buildings get around the world in relation to their context. And really… the language of this urban brutalist dream that is the HK PolyU campus is a product of its time and does not reflect what design innovators are doing at this point in time. Any further investment in architecture should support new ways of form exploration and form making.

CRITIC: The Tower facade, defined by a series of white aluminium fins is too flimsy.

ME: Actually I think it’s quite okay. I get that the horizontal striations are generally in line with the rest of HK Poly U’s Horizontal red bricked striations.

CRITIC: The windows and the buildings are too difficult to clean and maintain. They need to erect bamboo scaffolding to clean each area.

ME: You got me on that one. 

CRITIC: The floor layouts are too crazy.

ME: Actually the floor layouts are not bad. Each floor is a kind of place that is different from floor to floor. The corridors are as important as a place of gathering as are the classrooms. I would imagine design students could be more open to congregate within these playful spaces than traditional narrow corridors and boxy classrooms.

The vertical circulation without use of lifts is easy, using a main escalator from the Ground Floor Gallery to the First Floor, with subsequent floors connecting via a series of easy sloped staircases which are quite comfortable.

CRITIC: The paint job is a cheap white paint with no gloss or special finish. Design students can just easily scratch it.

ME: Agreed. I too am worried about the white paint used in the interior spaces, since it is a design school and different materials are always being lugged around by students.

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Now that all those critical statements are out of the way and addressed, lets focus on the Good. Yesterday we had the pleasure of attending the ribbon cutting at the Innovation Tower’s official opening to the public with Zaha Hadid and company in tow. After seeing a series of speeches, all the guests were immediately invited to rush into the new building to what turned out to be an open house.

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Here’s a few facts; the PolyU Design school was first established in 1964, which makes it 50 Year Old. In 2009 BusinessWeek rated its Master’s program as one of the World’s 30 Best Design Thinking Programmes. In 2013, PolyU Design became the only school in Asia to get in on Business Insider’s World’s Best 25 Design School list. While there is no Architecture Programme being housed here, they do teach Art / Education, Communication Design, Digital Media, Interior Design, Interactive Media, Product Design, Design Business, and Multimedia Entertainment Technology. 

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Construction work on the school began in 2009, shortly after Zaha Hadid was named Design Architect. Four years later, the building completed in August 2013. In total, it houses 15,000 square meters of net floor area, accommodating about 1,800 staff and students.

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While true that the building has its faults (what building has none?) overall the impression that I get here is that a Zaha building was achievable in a conservative city full of red tape like Hong Kong, and by the looks of some of the finishes… seemingly with the constraints of the allocated budget, which, correct me if i’m wrong, was about 40 million usd. 

BRAVA. TO. HER.

I mean, look at these spatial moments. It’s pure ArchiPron!

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#theWanderlist: Zaha Hadid x Stuart Weitzman in Hong Kong

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London based award winning Architect, Zaha Hadid, is everywhere in Hong Kong these days. For one, I’ll be attending the inauguration for her project for Hong Kong Poly U in two weeks, the Innovation Tower, Zaha’s first stand alone building in the city. Additionally, for those who have been shopping at Landmark Men’s Neil Barrett store in Central within the last two years, would get more than a hint that the shop is a Zaha-designed store. And priced at a whopping 1,500Euros online, sources say that Zaha’s United Nude shoe collaboration has been a hit in this city and mainland China as well.

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Now taking our love for shoes and architecture to the next level, look what I spotted walking around the Hong Kong IFC Mall the other night… Hong Kong’s brand new Stuart Weitzman flagship, one of a handful in the world designed by Zaha Hadid. Hong Kong and the Milan stores are some of the first in operation. Other locations to follow include New York City, Rome, and possibly London and Beijing.

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While the stores will conceptually be unique to each location, Hadid tells DEZEEN Blog that each “design is divided into invariant and adaptive elements to establish unique relationships within each worldwide location,” yet will all be conceptually and formally developed as if from the same family. This is to help establish the spatial direction as that uniquely of the Stuart Weitzman brand.

Enjoy my photos, and check out the shops (for architectural study of course. ahem.)

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Other Photos Spotted Online:

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VISIT Stuart Weitzman Hong Kong . Shop 3076, ifc mall, 8 Finance Street, Central, Hong Kong / DESIGN Zaha Hadid Architects

JJ.

DESIGN NOTES: Arts Pavilion For West Kowloon To Be Constructed by 2015

Young designers, VPANG architects ltd. + JET Architecture Inc. + Lisa Cheung, have just been named by the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority (WKCDA) as the 1st Prize winners for the Arts Pavilion design competition for a site on West Kowloon. The winning design team will therefore be appointed to design and deliver this smaller scale exhibition space sitting south-west of Herzog & de Mueron’s M+, which is estimated to be completed by 2015… two years before M+ completion in 2017.

According to the WKCDA, the pavilion is designed to host extension exhibits for the M+, as a way to bring some shows “outside the box” so to speak, and into the public sphere that is the site’s garden promenade.

via Dr. Lars Nittve, Executive Director of M+ and Co-chairman of the Jury Panel:

The way the first prize winning design fitted into the landscape and frames the views of Hong Kong, creating an outdoor space, which easily flows into a well proportioned space, are merits of the design.  It also allows for certain design flexibility and consideration, essential for a small-scale exhibition space like this.

There were 3 Winning Entries and 6 commendation entries.

INFO West Kowloon Cultural District / DESIGN VPang Architects LTD. / DESIGN JET Architecture 

JJ.

DESIGN NOTES: HK’s East Kowloon By Design, What To See

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Due to a really slow work month, me and my designers took one afternoon off to check out this year’s architectural pavilions on exhibit for the 2013 Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism \ Architecture (UABB) in Hong Kong. For those of you who have lived in Hong Kong for a while, and are a bit confused, the “Bi-City” is a politically correct way to say Hong Kong and Shenzhen without having to worry which city to name first in the official title.

What makes visiting it this year so confusing is that this used to be called the “Hong Kong-Shenzhen Bi- City Biennale of Urbanism and Architecture”, but with the new name has broken up into two separate websites (which barely link to each other for some reason) with two separate graphic brandings / logos. 

HK UABB BRANDING:

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SHENZHEN UABB BRANDING:

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I really wish they would just stick with one brand, one logo, one website, or at least have each a clear web link for information between the two. The HK site has a small tiny logo in the lower left hand side which links to the SZ programme (but the logo looks like sponsor…not actually part of the programme). The SZ site has no link back to Hong Kong. That said once you’ve gone past the initial confusion and realize it’s both the same biennale, you have until February 28 to spend half a day on the Hong Kong showing, and a full day on the Shenzhen showing.

I have yet to visit the Shenzhen arm of the exhibition, but at least me and my designers were able to spend a couple of hours checking out the Hong Kong exhibits which are “bi-harbour”, meaning the sites for the shows are both on the Kowloon side of the Harbour in Kwun Tong, and the Hong Kong side in North Point/Fortress Hill.

The Kwun Tong site is fascinating. For those visitors who only know Hong Kong via the glittering towers of Central or the hilly terrain of Lantau, Kwun Tong was once one of Hong Kong’s most highly industrial areas centered around the salt trade amongst other things.

The neighborhood is currently undergoing an kind of development renaissance since the government will be putting in place an MTR connection here, in part to serve the newly opened Kai Tak Cruise Terminal designed by Foster + Partners on a strip of site that was once the Kai Tak Airport, which is parallel to the Kwun Tong Promenade… the site of the UABB. Of course with any development, controversy always follows, and the UABB, a bi-annual event that seeks to question the urbanistic growth between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, was a target of activists who wanted to focus on the the Government’s pro-development schemes of the Kwun Tong neighborhood. Even some of the event organisers and partners were not allowed into the programme’s opening day of which Chief Executive, CY Leung was in attendance.

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That said, here are some highlight photographs* from the Hong Kong exhibit that you should take note of:

+ EKEO (Energizing Kowloon East Office) Hong Kong Head Office Temporary Building / Designed by Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) and the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD)

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According to their website, the EKEO office was set up in 2012 to "steer, supervise, oversee, and monitor the development of Kowloon East (Kwun Tong) with a view to facilitating its transformation into another premier CBD of Hong Kong." The building currently highlights a study of a smart transportation system, using a rechargeable scooter bike, which can make use of existing buildings and alleyways to help promote new grassroots commercial ventures. 

The most interesting part about this is actually the temporary building which houses the exhibition, designed by the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD) and the Architectural Services Department (ArchSD).  The building was completed in 6 months, taking 3 months for design, and 3 months for construction. Housing 20 staff members, the building used recycled freight containers for a modular scheme, amongst utilisation of raw bamboo, low flow water technology, daylight sensors, recycled aggregates to help lower its carbon footprint overall.

+ House of Red . House of Blue / Designed by Kacey Wong

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Kacey Wong’s introverted House of Red . House of Blue pavilion is an open air library cocooned in a croissant-like pavilion made of burnt wood and chopped down tree trunks. The books in the pavilion set amongst the seats and the trunks of trees, all focus on the subject on Hong Kong and China’s built environment and building culture.

+ Make Out City / Designed by Architectkidd, CHAT, Studiomake, Thingsmatter

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Make Out City is an interesting formal work designed by Bangkok designers, Architectkidd, CHAT, Studiomake, and Thingsmatter. All the pieces for this lookout platform with two seats were fabricated by hand in Bangkok and shipped to Hong Kong. According to the designers, the work “illustrates the hybridized manner in which (they) like to fabricate things. It is a long, skinny lookout platform (which allows) visitors to climb out and gaze out onto the water.” Additionally they wanted to point out that the piece is made of four separate components; stair, structure, platform, and periscope. Which I suppose is why it takes four designers to design the whole thing?

+ Kwun Tong Promenade Stage 1 / Designed by Architectural Services Department (ArchSD) and the Civil Engineering and Development Department (CEDD)

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#theWanderlist: LWK’s The Wishing Forest in Tai Po

Here’s something to look forward to if going to the Victoria Park Flower Market in Causeway Bay is just not your thing for Chinese New year… The Wishing Forest in Tai Po, just launched last week, is definitely worth an option. Designed within Hong Kong firm, LWK & Partners’, new Parametric oriented studio, Paralab, The Wishing Forest Exhibition Pavilion, is one of two major exhibits in association with the annual Heritage x Arts x Design (H.A.D.) Walk Project, this year in Tai Po & Fanling respectively.

According to the architects, The Wishing Forest pavilion is over 10,000 square feet and is located in the historic Lam Tsuen Wishing Square, a pseudo-spiritual site for local people to hang wishes on a sacred tree (which is now off limits due to its preservation.) In response to the old tree, LWK architects; Patrick Ng, Haynie Sze, and Bennett Bossert, used the form and construction method of traditional bamboo fixing with the aid of Parametric Modeling techniques, to devise a plan and a system for a three-tier exhibition zoning experience. 

The Pavilion is then partially enclosed with translucent canvas, in both red and white color to reflect duality and unity that lanterns bring to this season. 

VISIT The Wishing Forest Exhibition Pavilion (Part of the H.A.D. Walk Project) . From 18.JAN.2014 - 23.FEB.2014, 11AM - 6PM . FREE ADMISSION . Tai Po Lam Tsuen Wishing Square, Hong Kong . T: +852-27802283

JJ.

First in Asia, M+ Museum and Architecture Collection Previews in Hong Kong’s ArtisTree

Originally published on 16.Jan.2014 via INDESIGNLIVE HONG KONG

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Above, Herzog & de Meuron’s winning M+ Building Competition.

The M+ Museum, the main cultural anchor of the West Kowloon Cultural District (WKCD), is slated to open in 2017. However, prior to its launch, the museum and its curatorial teams have been busy spending the last several months giving form to its vision as a “museum of visual culture” via a continuous effort on the building of its works – local, regional, and global. Prior to the unveiling of the museum’s Architecture Collection at ArtisTree last week, the museum so far has had a jump start with the news of its Sigg Collection thanks to a sizeable donation of over 1,500 pieces by Swiss collector, Uli Sigg, the world’s largest universally recognised private collector of Chinese contemporary art from the 1970’s to present.

Below, Utopic constructs by Urbanus, Steven Holl, and MAD Architects.

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Excluding the Sigg Collection, M+ has since recently acquired around 800 works to date, of which 80 per cent are by local artists and designers. A percentage of this is of course the Architecture collection, the first and only one of its kind in Asia, consisting of models and drawings of realised and unrealised architectural and urban projects as it relates to Hong Kong and China, including all shortlisted entries to the actual design of M+ itself. The show, part of the museum’s “Mobile M+” series of exhibitions allow Hong Kong’s citizens to engage with the museum’s curated programmes in the people’s turf (site specific shows all over town), and is certainly more than a peek of things to come. This allows curator, Aric Chen, and Assistant Curator, Shirley Surya, to present their vision of what it means to house a permanent collection of Architecture as it relates to visual culture and the Hong Kong context.

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Above, M+ Building Design entries by Shigeru Ban and Renzo Piano, respectively.

As of now, the vision for the exhibition – excluding the M+ competition collection – is posited via five lenses: Place Making (Architecture within locality), Crossed Transfers (Architectural form studies beyond cultural borders), Urban Laboratory (manifested urban strategies as it relates to Hong Kong), Critical Futures (grand Utopic ideals), and Digital Reality (conceptualisation of space via Computer-aided Design). I’m pretty sure the narratives will continue to evolve even beyond the Museum’s actual opening, as new issues and frameworks present themselves from now until then. However as it is presented at this moment, the chapters work well at indexing a varied collection, defined by multiple mediums.

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Above, brick work by Jiakun Architects.

Scale models of stand-alone buildings from designers Ai Wei Wei, Steven Holl, and William Lim of CL3 are placed adjacent to full sized brick works via Jiakun Architects’ “Rebirth Brick” project for the survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Original courtyard drawings by modernist master Ludwig Mies van der Rohe are exhibited adjacent to studies of courtyards by Jackson Wong Chack Sang, who founded Wong & Ouyang. Of course models of completed typical Hong Kong residential towers by Rocco Design Architects and unbuilt dream towers by MAD are expected of architecture shows, but it’s the critical studies by the likes of artists such as MAP Office, anothermountainman, and Cao Fei, that really give us a full picture of the affect of Hong Kong and China’s building culture.

Below, Photographs by anothermountainman.

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MAD Office’s Laurent Gutierrez and Valerie Portefaix question the grim practice of luxury tower design as subservient to the developer’s marketing message, usually as muddled euro-centric desires of the nouveau riche. Anothermountainman’s large-scale photographic prints reframe China and Taiwan’s uncompleted development dreams. Perhaps the best work that spoke to me in the whole collection is the one by artist Cao Fei, titled “The Birth of RMB City (2007)”, a video simulation of a virtual city comprising an amalgamation of architectures from China, Macau, and Hong Kong, built and destroyed within the online world of Second Life. I call it a critique of a building frenzy led by money; others would define it as an introspective work of the built environment.

Below, Cao Fei’s “RMB CIty” Video Installation and works by MAP Office.

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According to curator Aric Chen, “collecting architecture requires both humility and judgment… (with) a constant awareness that what and how a museum collects can have an impact on architectural practice itself.” The impact of such a collection to the building industry will only be clear several years from now, however with so much being torn down and built in China and Hong Kong these days, a building archive such as this one is necessary if only to define an architectural identity before it disappears completely to yet another one of the region’s bullet speed urban redevelopment projects.

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VISIT Mobile M+: The Museum and Architecture Collection will be held from 10 Jan – 9 Feb 2014. Opens daily from 10am – 8pm. ArtisTree, 1F Cornwall House, Taikoo Place, Island East, Hong Kong.

JJ.

DESIGN NOTES: Building the M+ Museum and Architecture Collection, Preview Exhibition Opens Tonight in Hong Kong

A landmark exhibition showcasing the first acquisitions and donations to the  M+ architecture collection is on exhibit at ArtistTree at Taikoo Place, Island East in Hong Kong starting tonight for cocktail preview 09 January 2014, and opens to the public officially tomorrow 10 January 2014. Also showing for the first time are the models and drawings of the winning design for M+ by architects Herzog & de Meuron with TFP Farrells and Ove Arup & Partners HK. 

The exhibition is only a preview of the landmark architectural collection that M+ is anticipating to have under the curation of Aric Chen, along with Shirley Surya, Assistant Curator. The exhibit, designed by SKEW Collaborative and graphics by Project Projects will include works from Hong Kong and China’s architecture and arts community, including donations by Ai Weiwei, CL3 Archtiects LTD, Dennis Lau & Ng Chun Man (DLN), JIAKUN Architects, MAD, Urbanus, Rocco Design, P&T (Palmer & Turner). 

Also except works from Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Steven Holl, Bernard Tschumi, OMA (Rem Koolhaas and Elia Zenghelis), plus non architects, Cao Fei, Andreas Gursky, Aernout Mik, and Stanley Wong aka anothermountainman… to help stress the museum’s multi-disciplinary focus.

According to Aric Chen, “Building M+ lays the first stakes around which the collection will continue to grow in scope and depth - and around which we hope the public can start to engage architecture in new ways.”

Images from top to bottom: Perspectives of the new M+ by Herzog & de Meuron, Iwan Baan’s Guangzhou Opera House #1 (2010), Andreas Gursky’s Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank (1994), MAD Architects’ Beijing 2050 (2006), Tao Ho Design’s Metroplan WKCD Concept Model (1988), Ian Lambot’s Aerial View from South West of Kowloon Walled City 1989 (2013), and Fitch & Cheung’s Peak Tower Model (1967).

VISIT Building M+: The Museum and Architecture Collection . 10 January - 09 February 2014 . ArtisTree, 1F, Cornwall House, Taikoo Place, Island East, Hong Kong . Opens 10AM - 9PM . Free Admission

JJ.

#JJStyle: Red and Blue At The Lonestar State

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Two weeks ago, I decided to give myself a break and purchased a last minute ticket online to fly back for my annual family Christmas get together in Fort Worth, Texas (aka “The Lonestar State”)… my hometown. 

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As expected with most all-American (relatively) mid-sized towns like Fort Worth, everything is all spread out. In Texas we call this spread a “sprawl”, the opposite of Hong Kong density.

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Texas is SPRAWLING.

Below and Above, The Kimbell Museum designed by Louis Khan.

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For this brief non-Asia specific blog post, I wanted to present my photos of Texan “sprawl” as it relates to some of Fort Worth’s most unique cultural treasures, a group of world class museums which emerge lightly like an oasis on a sea of a very flat wintery beige landscape.

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First off, I find the sheer existence of these museums, with their breathtaking and unique collections set… in the middle of Fort Worth’s vast flat grassland really oddly fascinating. How did these clusters of museums get built on this site… amongst the flatness, the occasional taco stand, the gas station, and some 1950’s post-war reconstruction government edifices, in the first place?!

Well thanks to Oil Money and a very philanthropic minded Oil Family (the Bass Family), all these museums stand here today. That said, I’m thankful to have had such an access to the Kimbell Art Museum’s rare permanent collections at such formative years. The Kimbell houses a highly curated and select collection of important works by old-world masters such as, Rembrandt, Caravaggio, El Greco, Velazquez, in an intimate building designed by none other than a master, Louis Kahn. It’s no surprise that I ended up following a creative career path with that kind of cultural influence in my own back yard.

As I recently walked in and around Kahn’s introverted yet timeless building most notable for its series of barrel-vaulted roofs, I was immediately transported back to all those moments when my relationship with art and architecture first bloomed right there in that very museum.

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imageAbove, the Kimbell Extension by Renzo Piano.

Other buildings I visited in the museum complex; the newly opened glass roof extension to The Kimbell, by Italian architect, Renzo Piano. Across the street, and about twice the size of the Kahn’s Kimbell, at two full stories, my other favorite; The Modern, by Japanese architect, Tadao Ando, with a collection of contemporary masterpieces.

Below, The Modern by Tadao Ando.

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Both buildings by Piano and Ando, with their repetitive roof forms, also sit lightly on a generally flat site just like The Kimbell. Both designs are strongly influenced by Khan’s Kimbell planning, the Kimbell being at the core of Fort Worth’s museum complex, tying three beautiful modern buildings together.

Lucky Forth Worth.

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I just want to add that before I flew to Texas, I was graciously gifted one of only 74 limited edition travel satchels… a special red and blue colored Seventy Eight Percent ”Dimitri”, designed by an amazing person, Hong Kong based- Israeli designer, Shai Levy, a creative I covered on this blog several times before. 

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What makes the bag special is that it is Seventy Eight Percent’s first collaborative bag ever, this one with noted New York accessories designer, Eddie Borgo, a jewellery wunderkid who is known for his luxuriously sleek-yet-punk triangular and pyramid shaped motifs. This bag’s print of “interlocking triangles” is definitely a great example of that formal obsession with the triangle…. my favorite shape.

Below, Bag by Seventy Eight Percent x Eddie Borgo, Levi’s Jeans, Club Monaco Blazer, Watch by Daniel Wellington, shirt by J.Crew, Shoes by Ralph Lauren.

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The “Dimitri” Eddie Borgo bag was a perfect travel companion to the States for me. I was able to fit everything in this stress-free and stylish lightweight carry-all… my SLR camera, sunglasses, passport, travel documents, wallet, iPad, keys, diary, and smartphone. With everything that I placed inside, it was still a surprisingly light carry.

Material of the leather is vegetable tanned (great for the environment), and the canvas a Japanese cotton.

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The limited edition Eddie Borgo bag is available now at Lane Crawford Hong Kong (IFC, Harbour City, Times Square Causeway Bay) and Lane Crawford online and comes in Beige and Brown. Another collaborative line is with Brooklyn-based artist, Julia Chiang, available in all Blue and Beige and Green. A portion of the proceeds of the collaborative bags go to the Changing Lives Foundation, a foundation focused on reaching out to underprivileged youngsters in Hong Kong and Mainland.

And because it’s red and blue, it was THE perfect travel accessory for a trip to the U.S.of.A! It was good to be back, albeit briefly.

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SHOP Seventy Eight Percent x Eddie Borgo . Seventy Eight Percent x Julia Chiang / WEAR Seventy Eight Percent / WEAR Eddie Borgo / FOLLOW Julia Chiang Artist / VISIT Kimbell Art Museum / VISIT The Modern Fort Worth / CHARITY INFORMATION Changing Lives Foundation in Hong Kong

Style Photography Courtesy of Travis Guba Los Angeles

JJ.

theWanderlister+ Top 10 Stories of 2013

As my final end-of-2013 wrap-up-post before the blog sees new stories for 2014, I’d like to revisit 10 of our most read post from last year. These posts are not necessarily my most favorite, or the ones i’m in love with (heck the ones I loved the most turned out to be the least read…so who knows).

Anyway what this list successfully shows is a skimmed overview of the trends and events that got people interested on Wanderlister.com. Highlights include Monocle Magazine’s big Hong Kong and APAC tour, Art Basel’s inaugural Asian branded fair, the emergence of proudly made Hong Kong labels like PYE, the popularity of public inflatable Art, and the turn to Southeast Asian and Filipino cuisine in the city.

Anyway, 2013 was so so cool in so many ways, hope 2014 is even better!

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#10 / MEDIA / MONOCLE MAGAZINE SHOP

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13 FEB 25 - The Monocle Shop in Hong Kong recently entertained friends and family of Monocle Magazine via a block party, hosted by Editor-in-Chief Tyler Brule, Advertising Director, Anders Braso, and Hong Kong’s newest bureau chief,Aisha Speirs, as part of their big APAC push.

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#09 / EVENT / OFF-ART BASEL HONG KONG 2013

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13 MAY 19 - Art Basel Hong Kong (ABHK) arrives for the first time in our great city with tons of buzz. For those who are new to all this, all you need to know that this art fair in Hong Kong is the 3rd largest art fair in the world, third only to Art Basel in Basel and Art Basel in Miami. Before we get further into the fair, so much is happening around the city with “OFF-Basel” (Official and Unofficial) Activities in the build up to opening night.

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#08 / DINING & LEISURE / SCARLETT AND MAGGIE CHOO’S

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13 MAY 04 - Bangkok is quite good with super “Designed” Wallpaper*-esque nightlife concepts and offerings and has been since the emergence of “IT” joints like Bed Supper Club, FACE Bar, and Fallabella in the last decade. While those bars are a memory of what they once were, making waves as of late are two new hotspots located high above the city with, SCARLETT, perfect for those wanting a sunset with a scene, and a new “speakeasy” very low underground, at the new/old Maggie Choo’s, for those wanting a bit of naughty privacy.

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