#ARTBASELHK13: From Booth to Booth, A Walk-through. Kusama, Adrian Wong, T’Ang Haywen, and More.

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Art Basel in Hong Kong may have just finished its first year of exhibition last week… and while some of my friends are either at the Venice Biennale and/or Basel now to prepare for Art Basel in Switzerland opening June 13th, i’m here in Hong Kong to enjoy the new summer weather and to upload these photos for you guys of course.

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The world did not end on December 21, 2012. In fact, the world has moved on as normal, and on January 21st, 2013, celebrated Mainland Artist, Song Dong, fresh from his show at dOCUMENTA (13) in Germany, will be launching one of his biggest works to date and first solo show in Hong Kong to address the apocalypse and the lack there of. The exhibit is in cooperation with ArtisTree, M+, and the Asia Art Archive (AAA). The artist with 432 members of the public will stage a participatory performance piece manipulating 36 hand drawn wire bound annual household wall calendars. Song Dong’s interest lies in the investigation of socio-political issues and art within the context of history, specifically the last 36 years of history. The outcome? You’ll just have to go and see it.
From Claire Hsu, Executive Director of the AAA:



Song Dong’s 36 Calendars emerges out of the potential of the archive as a platform to re-think history and memory, both through the individual voice and as a community. ‘AAA’s partnership with M+ signals an exciting direction towards the kind of exhibitions that the Hong Kong public can experience in the future. It serves as an example of the importance of cultural institutions working together towards achieving the common goal of bringing art to as wide an audience as possible.




Doing Nothing Garden 2010-12, Song Dong. (via DOCUMENTA13)
ART Song Dong’s 36 Calendars 
JJ.

The world did not end on December 21, 2012. In fact, the world has moved on as normal, and on January 21st, 2013, celebrated Mainland Artist, Song Dong, fresh from his show at dOCUMENTA (13) in Germany, will be launching one of his biggest works to date and first solo show in Hong Kong to address the apocalypse and the lack there of. The exhibit is in cooperation with ArtisTreeM+, and the Asia Art Archive (AAA). The artist with 432 members of the public will stage a participatory performance piece manipulating 36 hand drawn wire bound annual household wall calendars. Song Dong’s interest lies in the investigation of socio-political issues and art within the context of history, specifically the last 36 years of history. The outcome? You’ll just have to go and see it.

From Claire Hsu, Executive Director of the AAA:

Song Dong’s 36 Calendars emerges out of the potential of the archive as a platform to re-think history and memory, both through the individual voice and as a community. ‘AAA’s partnership with M+ signals an exciting direction towards the kind of exhibitions that the Hong Kong public can experience in the future. It serves as an example of the importance of cultural institutions working together towards achieving the common goal of bringing art to as wide an audience as possible.

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Doing Nothing Garden 2010-12, Song Dong. (via DOCUMENTA13)

ART Song Dong’s 36 Calendars 

JJ.

Asia Art Archive Launches Collection Online For Free To The Public, This Week

Art on theWanderlister+ by Natasha Kaye Whiffin

(via Asia Art Archive)

Hong Kong based non-profit organization Asia Art Archive (AAA) launched their new website and online collection Wednesday to much anticipation. The archive’s primary initiative is to facilitate understanding, research and writing in the field of contemporary art in Asia and they’re currently working towards further making public their impressive collection of the past 4 years. Over 3,000 items including images, video documentation and primary source materials are now available on the new online platform free of charge.

Another Life: The Digitised Personal Archive of Geeta Kapur and Vivan Sundaram  (via Asia Art Archive)

As part of the organizations continuing efforts to document and digitize otherwise unseen and unavailable materials, the digital collection management team headed up by Jamie Hsu work behind the scenes to build the infrastructure for the constantly evolving database of over 34,000 records. “With the launch of Collection Online, it is the first time that AAA is providing immediate content that can be accessed at any time and place.” Hsu said. The main goal in developing the website interface was to “provide an in-depth and direct browsing experience” which “encourage interpretive research”.

Fine Arts in China (中國美術報) AAA hold the complete series of the weekly art newspaper published in Beijing between 1985 and 1989. (via Asia Art Archive)

Head of strategy and special projects, Chantal Wong notes that the platform is also a space to host the archives research initiatives, such as the newly launched e-journal Field Notes. “We are really excited (to launch the journal), It is an opportunity to invite experts, scholars, curators, artists, thinkers, archivists across disciplines to share their thoughts and debate”.

The inaugural issue asked 40 contributors ‘to consider the notion of the contemporary in art – within the context of Asia.”

Asia Art Archive Backroom Conversations, ARTHK12 (via Asia Art Archive)

 

In todays digital world concepts of knowledge transfer are constantly being re-assessed and AAA’s Executive Director, Claire Hsu hopes to address this with the new website. “There is a significant shift in the way information is presented in the new site”, she said, “not only is there more material, but it is carefully interlinked; we hope users will be able to navigate it in ways that will be more personally useful.”

(via Asia Art Archive)

Looking ahead, AAA will be focused on increasing digital access to the information in its collection as it partners up with U.S image database organization ArtStor, as well as Indonesian based Visual Art Archive (IVAA), recognizing needs to collaborate with other institutions the archive will continue on in their efforts to make public fundamental information.

AVAILABLE NOW VIA ASIA ART ARCHIVE ONLINE:

AAA Special Collections -  A digitization of unseen primary materials including the personal archives of indian art collective and duo Geeta Kapur and Vivian Sundaram, documentation from renowned Filipino artists and curator, Roberto Chabet and the ongoing Contemporary Chinese Art collections Materials of the Future: Documenting Contemporary Chinese Art from 1980-1990 which includes The Mao Xuhui Collection, The Zhang Peili Collection and The Zhang Xiaogang Collection.

Field Notes - The tri-annual bi-lingual journal brings together texts from leading scholars, critics and artists in a range of fields, its first edition The And: An Expanded Questionnaire on the Contemporary addresses notions of the ‘contemporary in art’. Available for download here: http://www.aaa.org.hk/FieldNotes/Current

For more information, contact Kennis Lai, Head of Communication at kennis@aaa.org.hk. To support Asia Art Archive’s efforts please contact Anjali Grover at anjali@aaa.org.hk / http://www.aaa.org.hk

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Natasha Kaye Whiffin is Hong Kong born, former Londoner specialising in contemporary art, culture and art markets. With a BA in Photography from London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, she is currently working with a Hong Kong based contemporary art gallery and is an active viewer of art in its many forms. Website: www.natashawhiffin.com / Twitter: @nwhiffin  / natasha.whiffin@gmail.com

Art HK12 (Part 2): Learning Your Art Fair Etiquette, Then Practicing It… By Winning 2 Fair Tickets on Us!

Art on theWanderlister+ by Natasha Kaye Whiffin

It is an unwritten rule that within the confines of a gallery’s white walls, a certain code of conduct is expected. Although more commonly seen in the rule books of most museums, gallery etiquette has acquired its own set of parameters, whereby visitors are informed about the manner in which they should appreciate art.

The more relaxed and somewhat festive air of an art fair should be no exception to this rule and on the eve of the much anticipated fifth edition of the Hong Kong International Art Fair with ART HK12, I ask… how does the general public or visitor go about viewing and appreciating works of art? Should there be rules? What is art fair etiquette?

ART HK11

Let us first review the definition of gallery etiquette. Rules include, that common command “Please do not touch the work” (unless of course the work calls for public participation). Of course, voices are expected to be kept low, not rising above a whisper, so as not to disturb or interrupt the train of thought of the other visitors. Then of course there is one of the most important and enforced rules, “Please, no photography!”. I personally am biased in favour of this one and consider photography to be somewhat of a sin when viewing works of art. Its an obstruction in the process, a work of art seen first down the barrel of a lens, is not a true introduction.

What you see on your computer screen at home on the sofa afterwards is not a true image or representation of the work either. You must dedicate your time in the consideration of what you see before you in that first instance, only then should souvenir photographs be taken as form of documentation of your experience.

Visitor photographing sculpture by Anish Kapoor at ARTHK11

Last year it was of common practice during the Hong Kong International Art Fair for most public viewers who were visiting to first look through the camera lens at what was on display. The work was then immediately seen on the preview screen of a digital camera and then if they were on their phone, as many were, it was tweeted, facebooked and or put on ren ren for all the world to see (Instagram hadn’t quite taken of yet, but I’m sure it would have been flooded with images almost instantaneously ).

Only after this technological flurry of activity, did they then look up to actually view the work for what it was. I am unsure if the camera and social networking culture here in Hong Kong played a role in this, or if the lack of museum infrastructure failed to prepare the public for what they were about to see, but I found myself bewildered by this technology-facilitated lack of art viewing etiquette. I thought everyone knew the unspoken rules. Please understand, I am not suggesting that Hong Kong’s public are culturally stunted towards art in general, on the contrary, I am proud of Hong Kong’s new found art oasis and its rapid and exponential rise. Our city has progressed from solely an international economic hub to now also, a hive of art and culture - and the rest of the world is starting to sit up and take notice.

It is a result of this that this year’s public programming at the fair reflects just that evolution, a culturally rich structured collaboration with some of Hong Kong finest leading cultural and educational institutions, such as the fairs educational partner Asia Art Archive, local trailblazers Para/site art space and the in the making, M+ (WKCD). Between them, a wealth of stimulating and engaging programming will be on offer, with an array of happenings in the form of lectures, tours and public art interventions to enrich the mind on the matter of contemporary art today.

Couple gaze at chinese artist Lui Wei’s installation at ARTHK11 

Let this be said, I have no quarrel with the lady whom first stepped on the installation to photograph it, nor do I have choice words for the man whom first turned his back on the Picasso only to pose for a portrait by its side. I simple propose that those wrongs be amended in their attendance of this year’s outstanding public programming initiatives. So, in the midst of anticipation leading up to the Hong Kong Art Fair, I implore and attempt to appeal to the masses to acquire a sense of awareness for art fair etiquette: Leave your cameras at home, come with you minds at rest and experience the works first with your own eyes. It will be worth it.

+ Para/Site x theWanderlister+ Asia ART HK12 Art and Champers Giveaway

From now Monday, May 7th to Friday, May 11th, simply email us at info@wanderlister.com with the subject “I want ART HK12 Tickets Now!”. You and a friend will get to tour the major galleries at ART HK12 with us over glasses of Veuve Champagne on Saturday, May 19th. Three (3) Pairs of Tickets in total to be given away. You can only have one entry per name/email.

This intimate and personal tour will be conducted by our friends at Para/Site Art Space. For more information on the Para/Site, ‘Art Walks’ please click this link.

Please dont forget to also write down your name, email, and phone number of contact so we can message you immediately by next weekend if you’ve won! Simple as that! Hurry email us now!

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Natasha Kaye Whiffin is Hong Kong born, former Londoner specialising in contemporary art, culture and art markets. With a BA in Photography from London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, she is currently working with a Hong Kong based contemporary art gallery and is an active viewer of art in its many forms. Website: www.natashawhiffin.com / Twitter: @nwhiffin  / natasha.whiffin@gmail.com

Annual Fundraiser for Asia Art Archive, This Week. Previews Start Monday. Auction on Saturday.

The first time I met the insanely cool Natasha K. Whiffin was on Twitter while I was covering ArtHK11 back in May. There was supposed to be a Tweetup amongst the group (3 of us) covering ArtHK11 during that time, but while the other one, the HEART FAIRS BLOG’s Suraya Warden, showed up, Natasha was nowhere to be found, then she went back to England. Now Natasha is back, and we actually met in person several times since she’s been back to Hong Kong, taking on a position at the Asia Art Archive (AAA) (amongst other things) aiming to be really active promoting Hong Kong’s evolving art machine, via new media channels.

Asia Art Archive’s, Natasha at 10 Chancery Lane, Suzie Wong show a few months ago.

There always seems to be something going on with the Asia Art Archive, and recently they just hosted artist friend, Yuk King Tan, for a talk and a discussion on her works at the end of last October. Yuk King’s talk is just one of the many programs that the Asia Art Archive hosts in order to bridge the gap between the Asia’s art world and public education through the collection and archiving of works and the hosting of forums both in public and online. And now its time for you to help the Asia Art Archive!

Yuk King also at 10 Chancery Lane.

This week, more than 60 works from artists like sculptor Nadim Abbas, painter Simon Birch, Philippine National Artist Roberto Chabet, Chinese Artists Cao Fei and Wang Keping, all artists I’ve highlighted on this blog, will be donating their works directly or via their galleries to help raise funds for the Asia Art Archive through an auction. The AAA will host a dinner + preview at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in Admiralty this week, ending with an auction on Saturday at the China Club on Saturday. And yes… Murakami’s FLOWER series will be available at this auction full of significant works.

From AAA Executive Director Claire Hsu:

One of AAA’s priorities in the past few years has been working toward making our collection more accessible to the public. In 2010, we began work on a new website which will launch in spring 2012 along with the Collection Online, a new database platform which will gradually make as much of AAA’s collection as possible publicly accessible globally well into the future.

Preview is open to the public, but Auction at China Club is by invitation only. If you’re interested in either email the email shown below. Sound good? Get art AND help a great cause.

AAA Asia Art Archive Annual Fundraiser 2011 / Preview Period: 14-18 November 9:30 AM-6PM / Sotheby’s, Suites 3101-3106, 31F One Pacific Place, 88 Queensway, Hong Kong / email: fundraiser@aaa.org.hk / web: www.aaa.org.hk/fundraiser2011

JJ.

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